Tag: teaching

Refresh & Reset

Updating your classes for the new semester? Check out these resources for suggestions on classroom activities and expanding online options:

For classroom activities:

“Active Learning” (Cynthia J. Brame, PhD, CFT Assistant Director, Vanderbilt University)

6-page article with theory, evidence, examples and advice.

Guide to Designing Courses for Significant Learning (Item II; Dee Fink & Associates)

Lengthy (35-page) guide for multi-step process of integrated course design; significant pedagogical background above and beyond its focus.

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (Flash Version), hosted by Iowa State University

Not your thesis advisor’s Bloom’s. Updated, three-dimensional, and animated: cross-reference “knowledge dimension” and “cognitive process dimension” to reveal learning objectives. Menu links to lots of other interesting material from the Iowa State Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching. 

Tips for “Teaching Naked” (José Antonio Bowen)

Summary from Bowen’s popular and well-regarded book.

“What is Inkshedding?” (Russell Hunt, St. Thomas University)

Development of “freewriting” technique that aims to give writing a “social role” in the classroom; a practice that encourages student engagement in writing by ensuring their expectation of an audience.

For newsletters, archives, courses, blogs and groups:

ABLConnect

Online database of active learning practices hosted by Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching, including activities, lessons, projects, video tutorials, links to tech resources, and downloadable materials.

Edublogs

Huge educational blogging network, related to WordPress. Free hosting for course blogs with lots of cool features (cooler still if you pay $40/year).

Emerging Ed Tech

Weblog with diverse articles on technology as an instructional tool.

Faculty Focus

Collection of articles on strategies for teaching of all stripes: traditional classroom pedagogy, online, flipped, blended, etc.

Michelle Miller, PhD

Blog by prof from Northern Arizona University and author of books on teaching with technology.

Pedagogy Unbound

Website of University of Iowa professor David Gooblar that collects teaching tips and practical strategies by college teachers from all disciplines. 

Reacting to the Past

The famous project out of Barnard College, wherein students learn by running classes in which they take on roles in elaborate games set in the past.

Using Technology Outside of the Classroom

Overview of the basics for using email, Twitter, Facebook, online discussions, and virtual offices to free time in face-to-face classes–and how to maximize use of that freed-up time. One page of many comprising the online face of the Centre for Enhanced Teaching & Learning at the University of New Brunswick. 

For online content in many disciplines:

Educator.com

Merlot

MIT Open CourseWare

Open Education Consortium

TED-Ed

Udacity

Do you know of a resource that should be added to this list? Please leave a description of it in the comments. Thanks!

Second Faculty Colloquium for 2017-2018: Dave Sanders & Craig Kaplowitz

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Our second faculty colloquium for the academic year will feature two presentations focused on serving our current students.

Screeners are Coming … Will We Be Ready?
Dave Sanders

For the next 20 years, our universities will be primarily educating and serving the “Screeners,” a distinctive generation following the enormous cohort of Millennials. Because of the robust Millennial focus, educators, youth workers and churches have barely glanced at this new generation. While in its infancy, research on Screeners indicates marked differences from Millennials in almost every way. Utilizing the lens of Generational Theory may provide a beneficial approach for identifying and strategizing our engagement with Screeners in our classrooms. Like it or not, they’re coming in the next few years, and they will require a whole new approach on several of the educational fronts we have become accustomed to in our teaching pedagogy. Preparing over the next two years will establish Judson as an institution where Screeners will thrive and flourish. So, let’s do the work necessary to get ready for the Screeners!”

New Adventures in HiFi: Lessons from the Honors International Faculty Institute
Craig Kaplowitz

Grounded in the experience at the 2017 Honors International Faculty Institute, this presentation will explore the characteristics of Honors pedagogy and common elements it shares with good teaching practices more generally. Some framing questions include: What is Honors? What should I expect from Honors students? Is Honors pedagogy any different from simply good pedagogy? If a student asks for an Honors offering of a course, what are some ways I can accommodate them? Come explore Honors, whether you teach with The Honors Program, are interested in what’s going on in Honors, or are curious about trends in teaching and learning.

The colloquium will be held on Tuesday, January 30, at 11:00-12:30 in the Reed  Room. Refreshments will be served!

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First Faculty Colloquium for 2017-2018: Robert Wallace & Mark Torgerson

Our first faculty colloquium for the academic year will feature two presentations drawing from recent projects that join scholarly research with educational practices.
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Robert Wallace, “Reading the Old Testament through the Psalms”
In 1999, W. H. Bellinger gave a presentation in which he suggested that the book of Psalms might be a productive canonical starting point for further conversation for a theology of the whole Old Testament. Bellinger’s creative starting point became the springboard for this project. Additionally, active learning classroom exercises demonstrated the power of using context based learning in general and the Psalms in particular. This project uses the book of Psalms as a dialogue partner to produce a context-based introduction to the Old Testament text. A canonical starting point as a gateway into the rest of the Old Testament provides a special, and perhaps even sacred, place to begin.
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Mark Torgerson, “Wisdom Beyond Ourselves:  Teaching World Religions Today”
Religion is an integral part of human life.  Religion is a shared human experience among people of all cultures and countries.  With communication and transportation advancements of the last fifty years, more and more people of different faiths are encountering one another.  As incentives to migrate from one part of the world to another increase, nations are becoming less and less homogenous in their religious practices.  Achieving at least a base knowledge of world religions is increasingly helpful for interpreting the choices and actions of people around us and being a thoughtful neighbor.  This presentation includes insights concerning the teaching of religion to undergraduate students based in Mark’s recent participation in a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute concerning the teaching of world religions and drawing from recent travels in India and Nepal.  The project seeks appreciation for the common search for wisdom beyond ourselves that can inspire each of us to know and share our own faith with confidence and joy.
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The colloquium will be held on Tuesday, October 31, at 11:00-12:30 in LTOW E/F. To ensure the adequacy of refreshments and room arrangement, please register by Monday, October 23 by following this link.